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Drilling Ton-Mile is the work of drilling line that is commonly measured as the cumulative of the load lifted in tons and the distance lifted or lowered in miles. When the predetermined ton-mile limit is reached, drilling contractors will perform slip and cut drilling line to prevent drilling line fatigue.

Round trip ton-miles (RTTM) formula is listed below;

RTTM = (Wp x D x (Lp + D) + (2 x D) x (2 x Wb + Wc)) ÷ (5280 x 2000)

where
RTTM = Round Trip Ton-Miles
Wp = buoyed weight of drill pipe in lb/ft
D = hole measured depth in ft
Lp = Average length per stand of drill pipe in ft
Wb = weight of travelling block in lb
Wc = buoyed weight of BHA (drill collar + heavy weight drill pipe + BHA) in mud minus the buoyed weight of the same length of drill pipe in lb
** If you have BHA (mud motor, MWD, etc) and HWDP, you must add those weight into calculation as well not just only drill collar weight. **
2000 = number of pounds in one ton
5280 = number of feet in one mile

Example: Round trip ton-miles

Mud weight = 10.0 ppg
Average length per stand = 94 ft
Drill pipe weight = 13.3 lb/ft
Hole measure depth = 5500 ft
Drill collar length = 120 ft
Drill collar weight = 85 lb/ft
HWDP length = 49 lb/ft
HWDP weight = 450 ft
BHA weight from directional driller = 8,300 lb
BHA length = 94 ft
Travelling block assembly = 95,000 lb

Solution:

a) Buoyancy factor:
BF = (65.5 – 10.0) ÷ 65.5
BF = 0.847

b) Buoyed weight of drill pipe in mud, lb/ft (Wp):
Wp = 13.3 lb/ft x 0.847
Wp = 11.27 lb/ft

c) buoyed weight of BHA (drill collar + heavy weight drill pipe + BHA) in mud minus the buoyed weight of the same length of drill pipe in lb (Wc):

Wc = {[(120x85) + (49x450) + (8300)] x 0.847} – [(120+450+94) x13.3x 0.847]
Wc = 26,866 lb

Round trip ton-miles = [(11.27 x 5500 x (94+ 5500)) + (2 x 5500) x (2 x 95000 + 26,866)] ÷ (5280 x 2000)
RTTM = 258.75 ton-mile

Download round trip ton mile calculation sheet

Views: 4700

Tags: mile, round, ton, trip

Comment by Jim Riggs on April 4, 2010 at 10:30am
I've had it explained before but I really like it in black and white like this, Thanks!
Comment by William on October 15, 2011 at 5:12pm

Could you continuously average the string weight and multiply the average by the distance traveled and avoid having to do the detailed calculations?

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